Dr Oz: Gel Manicure Warning! Gel Manicures Cause Staph Infection

By on January 23, 2013

Dr Oz: Gel Manicure Warning

Many women visit nail salons every single day and lots of them go there for gel manicures. Gel manicures are considered one of the best ways to get a long-lasting manicure through a process that includes placing the hands under lamps that give off UV rays (in some cases for up to eight minutes!). Is it worth it or is it too risky? Dr. Oz is asking the question “Are Gel Manicures Safe” on his show today and if you have ever considered one for yourself, you must read this before heading to the salon.

Dr Oz: Gel Manicures Thin Nails By 50%

Dermatologist Anne Chapas said that gel manicures are inherently dangerous because while women are going to a salon for a treatment to make their nails look better, they are actually putting themselves at great risk. She went on to say that they cause a great deal of nail damage and even infection, but there are other health concerns as well.

Dr Oz: Gel Manicure Warning! Gel Manicures Cause Staph Infection

Dr. Anne Chapas said that gel manicures are not worth the risk to your health because they can cause staph, or even fungal, infections.

One of the biggest areas of concern with gel manicures is the removal process. Dr. Chapas said that they do not come off as easily as regular manicures, so a woman’s hands have to be soaked in acetone for a long period of time in order to effectively remove the gel manicure.

The bigger problem is that soaking is not enough, so a great deal of scraping is involved, which can lead to thinning of the nails. Dr. Chapas shared a startling statistic that just one gel manicure can cause a woman’s nails to thin by 50%, so if you already have thin nails to begin with, you should avoid this nail treatment for sure.

Dr Oz: Gel Manicures Cause Staph Infection

Dr. Oz demonstrated the abrasive removal process of a gel manicure, which involves a great deal of scraping of the fingernails. This intense process can not only harm the nails themselves, but also cause breaks the surrounding skin. The biggest danger with this process is that bacteria can get into the nail or surrounding skin and lead to a staph infection.

Dr. Anne Chapas said that the nails can then become red, painful and swollen, but there is also room for fungus to get in and cause a fungal infection. She added that there is simply no special occasion or event in a person’s life that is worth getting a gel manicure because of the high risk involved.

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Comments to Dr Oz: Gel Manicure Warning! Gel Manicures Cause Staph Infection

  1. Kayla Rose says:

    this is so inaccurate! you can use a wrap with cotton that has acetone on it to remove the gel, and minimizing exposure. There is no harsh “scraping” that needs to be done to remove it either, the gel will come of easily with the method I mentioned before. And if anyone is concerned about the uv light, use some waterproof sunscreen ahead of time. Funny how womens’ nails grow so well with gel on them and they are supposedly dangerous. As a knowledgeable nail technician I am disgusted by the awful ideas you are putting into future clients heads. Dr. Oz and Anne Chapas are not educated well enough the correct procedures of this service to make such claims. A properly train nail tech will not cut or use tainted tools. and in such case where you may get a small cut we are trained to disinfect the surroundings and clean and bandage the cut. We are not idiots. Go to a LICENSED PROFESSIONAL and there are no dangers. I demand Dr Oz retract his statement. and This website as well.
    Dr Oz, nail techs need justice.
    Honestly someone needs to sue you,
    Sincerely,
    Licensed Nail Technician

  2. Nail Gel User says:

    I have been getting gel nails for over a year. Prior to using gel, my nails split and cracked all the time. They were thin and used to curl around the tips of my fingers when they grew to that length. With gel, properly applied, they are strong, never break, grow out straight and never chip or crack. My gel nails typically last 5 weeks! (I get deep french nails so that it’s not obvious that the nails have grown out.) So, I’m not subjected to the UV lamp very often and when I am at the salon, they have a timer on the lamp, so I’m never under the light for more then 2 minutes at a time. I have less sun spots on my hands than when I started.

    When I get my nails redone every 5 weeks, there is no “scrapping” involved. They do wrap the tips in an acetone compound with cotton and foil and leave them sit that way for a while, then they gently file off just the softened gel. They never file into the nail. My nails are actually thicker than when I started going.

    One time I had the gel nails on for 7 weeks and one of them had lifted a bit. When I went in to change them out, the salon noted that I had some fungus starting to grow under where the gel had been on the nail where it had lifted. I was concerned and asked how it happened. They said because the gel had lifted and I’d left it that way for a couple of weeks, water got under the gel and a little stayed there. There wasn’t much, but they were really concerned and made sure to not touch it themselves and told me not to touch the nail. They cleaned it well and reapplied the gel which sealed it up again. The next time I went in on time, the fungus was all gone. The gel really seals the nail! If you see the gel starting to come up, you should get it removed and reapplied right away. If you ignore it and don’t properly maintain your nails, that’s when you can have problems. That is true of most things in life, so I don’t see it as a reason to avoid gels – just go to a salon that knows what they are doing, and make sure to properly maintain your nails.

    If you get gel nails make sure that the nail salon knows how to complete the process properly. I wouldn’t go just anywhere to get them done that way. Go to a shop that specializes in gel nails. Ask them where they got their training and if they’ve won any awards at trade shows. Verify that they know what they are doing and you should end up loving your nails every bit as much as I do!

  3. While many nail techs will fight and disagree with what has been said here, we on the other hand after being in the spa business for over 30 years agree with the concerns brought forth.

    We have seen hundreds of clients over the years helping them to restore their true nails using non-toxic methods and elements of nature. We have seen destroyed nail-beds, infections, nails so thick they look foolish and unreal. The chemicals in the products used are hands-down toxic on all levels no matter what anyone says, if it’s toxic, it has no place on or in our bodies.

    Has anyone ever asked why a nail tech wears a mask and never that of a client? Airborne dust that carries both the chemicals and cellular dust from the nails themselves even at the smallest amount is risky. The aggressive filing and mechanical grinding impacts the nervous system induce unwanted tension and stress. AND, what about the fact of the UV cures being used and not one nail-tech doing gels or anything using a UV has ever taken part to protect the hands of clients. Why are nail-techs not applying at least a sunblock?

    Gels are bad no matter what any nail-tech or manufacture states otherwise. We as skin care specialists will never support nor use on our clients anything that is toxic, aggressive or unsafe.The chemicals are toxic and will absorb into the system over time. No matter what amount of acetone being used, point is, it’s toxic and unsafe both from contact and vapors.

    Your nails breathe and are part of your over-all health. Impeding this natural function has affects on your body both short-term and over time.

  4. I have been getting gel polish manicures for over a year. I have been doing them on my own at home with my own tools, polish and light for the last 9 months. Gel polish (not tips) on my own natural nail surface has finally allowed me to have the long strong nails I’ve always wanted and has helped me to stop biting my nails because they look great all the time. Applied properly (i.e. very very thin coats), the polish removes easily with a small cotton pad soaked in remover and held on the nail with a tin foil wrap. The trick is breaking the seal of the top coat by gently filing with a nail file. Little or no scraping is involved and I certainly don’t remove my nail when I scrape! I use and LED light, not a UV light. All in all, I am very pleased with my gel polish.

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