Dr Oz: Gatorade & Mountain Dew Contain Flame Retardant & BVO Warning

Dr Oz: Flame Retardant Ingredient In Mountain Dew

Did you know that many chemicals are banned all over the world, but some of those chemicals are still making their way into products here in the United States? In this Dr. Oz Alert you will be stunned at the loopholes some companies use in order to put these dangerous chemicals into the very foods and drinks you are buying for your family. These shocking health threats are putting your kids at risk and you do not even know it.

Dr Oz: Banned Ingredient Found In U.S. Soda

Are you a soda drinker? Would it surprise you to hear that there is an ingredient in soda that is actually a flame retardant? That ingredient is banned in 100 countries, but it is still being slipped into the soda and sport drinks that you and your family are drinking. It is called Brominated Vegetable Oil (BVO) and was originally formulated by scientists as a flame retardant for children’s bedding and clothing, but soda companies began adding it to their products to keep the ingredients from separating while it sat on the shelf. Why have we not heard about this health threat before and, more importantly, why is it still being used in these drinks?

Dr Oz: Gatorade Contains Flame Retardants

Dr. Michael Jacobson from the Center for Science in the Public Interest, explained that Brominated Vegetable Oil is a food additive that is added to some drinks to give them certain properties, like citrus flavored sodas and sports drinks. They are beverages you or your kids could be drinking! Heather White from the Environmental Working Group told Dr. Oz that there are dangers to your health if you are consuming BVO in your favorite beverages. She noted studies in recent years that have shown a buildup of Brominated Vegetable Oil in breast milk as well as causing a problem with thyroid hormones and neurological development.

  • Mountain Dew
  • Fanta
  • Powerade
  • Fresca
  • Squirt
  • Gatorade

Dr Oz: Video Gamers High Risk For BVO Poisoning

Heather White cautioned that video gamers are at the highest risk for developing health problems from consuming BVO. She said this is because it is found in the types of beverages that players of video games will often drink so they can stay up all night playing a video game. They will often drink an extremely high amount, which has been found to cause memory loss, a loss of muscle control and even skin lesions in some cases.

Comments

  1. Dorothy DeVantier says

    As a mom, wife, and consumer…I buy alot of Pepsi, ( Mountain Dew etc products, Gatorade. NEVER AGAIN…unless BVO is removed!
    You MUST remove this ..or you accept that the dollar is more worthy than YOUR CHILDREN”s Health. I recently purchased beverages for an upcoming party ( NOT knowing they had BVO..and as a unemployed person , I was compelled to throw them ALL away! My FAMILY, FRIENDS , are worth it..that they can have other options of a healthier drink. Myself, family, and friends applaud Sarah ,and Dr. Oz for bring this to our attention.
    WE WILL WIN…OUR FUTURE IS AT STAKE.
    Sincerely,
    Dorothy

  2. Jill Weeks says

    I have been a sales rep for almost one year now with Advantage Sales and Marketing. My team that I am on is the Pepsico team selling in products to stores such as, Gatorade, Quaker and Tropicana. I was told by a manager a week ago about the story on BVO in Gatorade and was shocked as I knew nothing about it. I happened to be home a few days ago and was tunning into the Dr Oz show when I heard them taking about the subject and was horrified! I helped get this product into the stores and homes of others! This last Monday on our weekly team conference call I brought the issue up and was stopped with this comment,” If the FDA allows it then it has to be safe”. This did not go over well with me and I made my skin crawl most of the morning until I decided to send an e-mail to my two bosses. I stated what the one boss had said and then put “REALLY??” that is the moronic thinking of a lot of americans in regards to the FDA. ( I myself have been one of those americans) I also told them that I refuse to sell in anymore “sales scripts of gatorade” into the stores until the poison is removed. I urged him to look into more of the ingrediants in foods for himself as I have had to start doing since I have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease recently. I told him if I would not give this to my own kids how can I try to give it to friends, neighbors and community.

    This is day 3 since the e-mail and I was fired. The reasons were that I sent an e-mail to a Pesico(client) and it was a demeaning action and that I was refusing to abide by the job discription and agreement by refusing the selling of gatorade scripts a Pepsico product and calling it poison.

    I feel good about what I did, maybe I could have worded it a bit better but it is wrong that this is allowed in our drinks we give our kids or family members!!

  3. Phyllis Parks says

    After hearing a brief news note on the petition to remove BVO from Gatorade, because of skin lesions, we started researching and now believe the ingredient to be the major cause of not only skin lesions, but psychological issues our son has been dealing with for several years. Amazingly, everything fits. Despite lack of productive answers from Doctors, being off this one ingredient for a matter of days, was an amazing difference. His skin is clearing, his antisocial, reactive behavior is greatly improved, and continues to improve with each day. Thank God we saw that one news clip.
    I have forwarded the information to everyone I know, in hopes of sparing someone else the trouble we have endured.

  4. N Hamilton says

    U go Jill Weeks – its AWFUL that u were not given a choice between LIFE or “them”. I SO APPLAUD YOU!

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